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What Is The Candle Holder For Kwanzaa Called? Find Out Here!

  • Written By Candace 
  • Updated On
  • 7 min read
what is the candle holder for kwanzaa called

What Is The Candle Holder For Kwanzaa Called?

The candle holder for Kwanzaa is an important part of the celebration and is known as a kinara. The Kinara holds seven candles, each representing one of the seven principles of Kwanzaa. It is a symbol of African heritage and culture, and its design has been passed down through generations. In this article, we will discuss the history and significance of the Kinara and how it is used in modern Kwanzaa celebrations.

What is the candle holder for Kwanzaa called? The candle holder used in the Kwanzaa celebration is called a kinara.

The Kinara, which contains seven candles to signify the seven ideals of Kwanzaa, is a significant feature of the traditional festival of Kwanzaa. Three red candles flank the left side of the Kinara, while three green candles flank the right. In the middle is a single black candle. Unity, self-determination, joint mission, work and responsibility, cooperative economy, purpose, creativity, and faith are only a few Kwanzaa principles represented by the seven candles. Every night during Kwanzaa, you may show your support for and appreciation for these ideals by lighting a candle in this special Kwanzaa candleholder.

What is Kwanzaa?

Kwanzaa is a seven-day celebration of African heritage and culture from December 26th to January 1st. It was created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga to bring African Americans together and celebrate their shared history and culture. During Kwanzaa, black people gather to reflect on the past year, honor their ancestors, and celebrate the principles of Kwanzaa. The Kinara is an important part of the celebration, as it serves as a reminder of the seven principles and their importance to African American culture.

History of Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa was created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga to bring African Americans together and celebrate their shared history and culture. The first fruits of the harvest, or “matunda ya kwanza” in Swahili, are the inspiration for the holiday known as Kwanzaa. The African holiday is based on traditional harvest festivals, and the Kinara symbolizes African heritage and culture. The seven candles in the Kinara represent the seven principles of Kwanzaa: self-determination, unity, collective work and responsibility, purpose, cooperative economics, creativity, and faith. Lighting these candles each night during Kwanzaa is a way to honor and celebrate these principles.

The Holder for Kwanzaa Candles

The candle holder for Kwanzaa is an important part of the celebration and is known as a kinara. The Kinara holds seven candles, each representing one of the seven principles of Kwanzaa. It is a symbol of African people heritage and culture, and its design has been passed down through generations. The Kinara is traditionally made from wood or clay but can also be found in various materials such as metal, glass, and plastic. The Kinara is usually decorated with symbols of African culture, such as drums, masks, and other traditional African art.

How to Use the Candle Holder for Kwanzaa?

Step 1: Gather Supplies

Gather the supplies you need to light the Kinara. This includes the Kinara, seven candles, and a lighter or matches.

Step 2: Arrange Candles

Arrange the seven candles in the Kinara. Each candle should be placed in its holder, with one candle burning in each of the seven holders (i.e., Mishumaa Saba). The black candle should be placed in the center of the Kinara.

Step 3: Light Candles

Light each of the seven candles, starting with the black candle in the center and working your way outwards. As you light each candle, please take a moment to reflect on each of Kwanzaa’s principles and how they are important to African American culture.

Step 4: Celebrate Kwanzaa

Once all seven candles are lit, it is time to celebrate Kwanzaa! Spend time with biological family and friends discussing and reflecting on Kwanzaa’s principles and celebrating African American culture.

Step 5: Extinguish Candles

When it is time to end your celebration, extinguish each of the seven candles from left to right, place them back in the Kinara and store them away until next year’s Kwanzaa celebration.

Step 6: Clean Up

Once the candles have been extinguished and stored away, it is time to clean up. Make sure to safely dispose of any wax or debris from the Kinara and candles.

Step 7: Reflect

Take some time to reflect on the celebration and how it has impacted you. Think about what you have learned and how you can use these lessons in your everyday human life.

Why are Kwanzaa candles blue, black, and green?

The daily lighting of the Kinara is a significant tradition that takes place throughout Kwanzaa.

The first day begins with the black candle’s lighting, also referred to as the unity candle. On the second day of the ceremony, the crimson candle located directly to the right of the unity candle is lit. The third day sees the green candle lighting located to the unity candle’s immediate left. After this, the lighting of the candles will continue to alternate until day seven has passed.

It was Marcus Garvey, a civil rights activist and leader of the Pan-Africanism movement, who first designated black, red, and green as the symbolic colors of the African American people. Pan-Africanism was a movement that sought to unite people of African descent worldwide.

Clark points out that these colors were chosen. During the Kwanzaa celebration, the black culture candle is meant to represent the people of color, the three red candles are meant to represent the struggle or the blood that has been shed in the past, and the three green candles are meant to represent either the Earth or the many opportunities that lie ahead in the future.

Benefits of Celebrating Kwanzaa

  • Unity: Kwanzaa celebrates African heritage and culture, bringing people together to honor their shared history and values.
  • Self-Determination: Kwanzaa encourages individuals to take responsibility for their own lives and strive for self-improvement.
  • Collective Work and Responsibility: Kwanzaa emphasizes the importance of working together as a community to achieve common goals.
  • Cooperative Economics: Kwanzaa promotes economic cooperation among African American community members by encouraging them to support each other’s businesses, investments, and other community affairs.
  • Purpose: Kwanzaa helps individuals find purpose by reflecting on the past year and setting goals for the future.
  • Creativity: Kwanzaa encourages creativity through traditional decorations, music, dance, and storytelling activities.
  • Faith: Kwanzaa celebrates faith in God and encourages individuals to have faith in themselves and their abilities to make the positive source of life changes.

Where to Buy a Candle Holder for Kwanzaa?

When looking to purchase a candle holder for Kwanzaa, there are many options available. Many online retailers offer a variety of candle holders in different sizes and styles. Additionally, local stores may carry traditional African-style candle holders that are perfect for the Kwanzaa celebration. When shopping for a candle holder, it is important to consider the size of the candles that will be used and the size of the space where the holder will be placed.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Kwanzaa is a meaningful and important celebration that honors African heritage and culture. The Kinara, or candle holder, is an essential part of the Kwanzaa ceremony and can be found in various sizes and styles from online retailers or local stores. By lighting the seven candles of the Kinara each day during Kwanzaa, individuals are reminded of their shared black history and values and encouraged to strive for self-improvement, collective work, and economic cooperation.

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